Tom Hollihan

Thomas
A.
Hollihan

Professor of Communication
Tom Hollihan publishes in the areas of argumentation, media and politics, media diplomacy, political campaign communication, contemporary rhetorical criticism, and the impact of globalization on public deliberation.
Tom Hollihan
Tom Hollihan publishes in the areas of argumentation, media and politics, media diplomacy, political campaign communication, contemporary rhetorical criticism, and the impact of globalization on public deliberation.
Expertise: 
Argumentation, Advocacy and Rhetoric, Global, History, Politics, Public Diplomacy, Social Justice
Research and Practice Areas: 
Civic Engagement and Social Justice
News and Media Industries
Persuasion and Politics
Center Affiliation: 

Thomas
A.
Hollihan

Professor of Communication

Tabs

Professor Hollihan publishes in argumentation, media and politics, media diplomacy, political campaign communication, contemporary rhetorical criticism, and the impact of globalization on public deliberation. He is the author of several books including Diplomatic and Mediated Arguments in the North Korean Crisis: Engaging the Hermit Kingdom, The Dispute over the Diayou/Senkaku Islands: How Media Narratives Shape Public Opinions and Challenge the Global Order, Uncivil Wars: Political Campaigns in a Media Age, Arguments and Arguing: The Products and Process of Human Decision Making (with Kevin Baaske), and Argument at Century’s End: Reflecting on the Past and Envisioning the Future.

Professor Hollihan served as associate dean for academic affairs in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism from 1997-2007. He currently chairs the Executive Committee of the USC US-China Institute. He also chaired the Board of Trustees of the National Debate Tournament (NDT), the National Communication Association (NCA) Doctoral Education Committee, the NCA Taskforce on Legislative Reform, the NCA Committee on International Discussion and Debate, and the NDT National Committee. He has served as president of the American Forensic Association and the Western Forensic Association.

Professor Hollihan has been a visiting scholar at Renmin University, the Communication University of China, and Meiji University. He is a faculty fellow in the USC Center for Public Diplomacy and the USC Center for Communication Leadership. Professor Hollihan has served as a consultant to political candidates, elected officials, business leaders, and leaders of NGOs. He teaches senior US Navy officers in strategic communication and teaches in the Annenberg World Bank Summer Institute. He formerly taught in an Executive Education Program for the China Development Research Foundation. He also served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency of the United Nations.

Awards and honors:

Daniel M. Rohrer Research Award for best original scholarship in the field of argumentation, American Forensic Association (1988).
Daniel M. Rohrer Research Award for best original scholarship in the field of argumentation, American Forensic Association (1995).
Outstanding Debate Coach Award, University of Utah (1987).

Books

Diplomatic and mediated arguments in the North Korean crisis: Engaging the Hermit Kingdom. (Palgrave MacMillan, 2021)

Arguments and Arguing: The Products and Process of Human Decision Making, author (Waveland Press, first edition, 1994; Tsinghua University Press, 2018).

The dispute over the Diayou/Senkaku Islands: How media narratives shape public opinions and challenge the global order, author (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014). 

“Out of chaos breathes creation”: Human Agency, mental illness, and conservative arguments locating responsibility for the Tucson massacre, author (Rhetoric and Public Affairs, 2014).

Media diplomacy and U.S. - China military-to military cooperation. CPD: Perspectives on public diplomacy. (Los Angeles: Figueroa Press, 2012)

Journal Articles

“Rhetorical criticism as moral action revisited: Moral and rhetorical imperatives in a nation Trumped,” author (Western Journal of Communication, 2020).

“Weapons and words:
 Rhetorical studies of the Gabrielle Giffords shootings,” author (Rhetoric and Public Affairs, 2014).

“Market panics and the limits of national power and authority: An argumentative analysis of the 2011 Italian debt crisis,” author (International Journal of Communication, 2014).

Fall 2021

COMM 489: Campaign Communication
COMM 580: Media and Politics