Lindsay
Young

Assistant Professor of Communication
An expert on social networks and public health, Lindsay Young merges her training in quantitative social science with a critical perspective to explore the social mechanisms of health disparities in underserved, resource-restricted communities.
Academic Program Affiliation: 
An expert on social networks and public health, Lindsay Young merges her training in quantitative social science with a critical perspective to explore the social mechanisms of health disparities in underserved, resource-restricted communities.
Expertise: 
Computation and Informatics, Gender and Sexuality, Health, Organizations and Networks, Race and Ethnicity, Social Justice, Social Media
Research and Practice Areas: 
Health
Organizations and Networks
Center Affiliation: 

Tabs

Lindsay Young is an assistant professor of health communication and communication networks at USC Annenberg. Her research employs social-network and critical perspectives to identify, characterize, and interrogate the social contexts that contribute to and/or facilitate health disparities, access to critical health resources, and health behavior change in marginalized, resource-restricted communities. She has a particular interest in the contextual factors that affect HIV-prevention engagement among young sexual-minority men of color. To these ends, she applies a rich computational toolkit that includes stochastic network modeling, semantic network mapping, computational text analysis and predictive modeling.

Young’s work is also driven by a praxis orientation, governed by a desire to help affected communities leverage the power of their organic networks toward improved community health. To these ends, she draws on community-oriented, asset-based models of community development and social network theories of health behavior change to design community health interventions that privilege intrinsic structures and assets.

Currently, her work is supported by an NIH Career Development Pathway to Independence Award, funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Her work has been published in top-tier, peer-reviewed journals across multiple research domains such as Social Science and Medicine, AIDS and Behavior, Clinical Trials, Preventive Medicine Reports, Social Networks, and Network Science.

Prior to joining USC, she was a postdoctoral scholar at the Chicago Center for HIV Elimination at the University of Chicago. She earned her PhD in media, technology and society (MTS) from the School of Communication at Northwestern University, her MS in science communication from Drexel University, and her BA in public communication from American University.

Awards and honors:

NIH Pathway to Independence Award, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) (2018-2023)
Health Disparities Research Institute (HDRI) Fellow, National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities (2020)
Summer Institute in Computational Social Sciences (SICSS) Fellow, Duke University (2020)
NIH Summer Institute for Randomized Behavioral Clinical Trials Fellow, NIH Office of Behavioral Social Science Research (2019)
Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society (CAIS) Visiting Summer Fellow, University of Southern California (2018)

Journal Articles:

The potential of online social networking data for augmenting the study of high-risk personal networks among young men who have sex with men at risk for HIV,” co-author (Social Networks, 2020).

Modeling the Dynamism of HIV Information Diffusion in Multiplex Networks of Homeless Youth,” co-author (Social Networks, 2020).

Individual and Social Network Characteristics Associated with Peer Change Agent Engagement and Impact in a PrEP for Prevention Intervention,” co-author (AIDS and Behavior, 2020).

Online Group Topics and HIV-related Behaviors: Multilevel Mechanisms in a Facebook Group Affiliation Network among Young Black Men who have Sex with Men,” co-author (Social Science & Medicine — Population Health, 2020).

The multiplex social environments of young Black men who have sex with men: How online and offline social structures impact HIV prevention and sex behavior engagement,” co-author (Journal of Social Structure, 2019).

HIV prevention and sex behaviors as organizing mechanisms in a Facebook group affiliation network among young Black men who have sex with men,” co-author (AIDS and Behavior, 2018).

PrEP Chicago: A randomized controlled crossover peer change agent intervention to promote the adoption of pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention among young Black men who have sex with men,” co-author (Clinical Trials, 2017).

Social-structural properties and HIV prevention among young men who have sex with men in the House/Ball and Gay Family communities,” co-author (Social Science & Medicine, 2017).

Fall 2020

COMM 402: Public Communication Campaigns