Joe
Saltzman
Professor of Journalism and Communication

Program

Journalism M.S.

Phone

310-377-8883

Office

ASC 102B

More Joe

Words to live by

Joe Saltzman is a professor of journalism and communication at USC Annenberg and an expert in the image of the journalist in popular culture

Download

CV

Expertise

American Studies
Arts and Culture
Broadcast Journalism
Criticism
Entertainment
Ethics
Gender Studies
Globalization
Image of the Journalist
International Journalism
Long-form Journalism
Media Ethics
Media History
Media Portrayals
Popular Culture
Public Culture
Race and Ethnicity
Radio

Center Affiliation

The Norman Lear Center

Joe Saltzman, the director of the Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture (IJPC) and the author of Frank Capra and the Image of the Journalist in American Film, is an award-winning journalist who is professor of journalism and communication, and former associate dean at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California.  He is the co-author of new book Heroes and Scoundrels: The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture" (University of Illinois Press, 2015) written by Matthew Ehrlich and Joe Saltzman.

Explore the world of Heroes and Scoundrels Journalist in Popular Culture Project:
The Book: Heroes and Scoundrels: The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture
Short Video introduction to the book : 9:42
Long Video introduction to the book: 22:35
The Heroes and Scoundrels Video is the 40-hour companion video to the book
The Heroes and Scoundrels Web site continously updates and adds supplementary material to the book.

He received his B.A. in journalism from the University of Southern California and his M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. After working for several years as a newspaper reporter and editor, Saltzman joined CBS television in Los Angeles in 1964 and for the next ten years produced documentaries, news magazine shows, and daily news shows, winning more than fifty awards including the Columbia University-duPont broadcast journalism award (the broadcasting equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize), four Emmys, four Golden Mikes, two Edward R. Murrow Awards, a Silver Gavel, and one of the first NAACP Image awards.

Saltzman was among the first broadcast documentarians to produce, write, and report on important social issues, including Black on Black, an historic ninety-minute program with no written narration on what it is like to be an African-American in urban America in 1967; Rape, a 30-minute 1970 program on the crime that resulted in changes in California law; The Unhappy Hunting Ground, a 90-minute documentary on the urbanization of Native Americans, one of the few documentaries ever made on the subject; The Very Personal Death of Elizabeth Holt-Hartford, a 30-minute program on what is like to get old in America, The Junior High School (Part One, "Heaven Hell or Purgatory" and Part Two, From 'A' to Zoo"), a two-hour program on education in America in 1970, said by one critic to be the "best documentary ever made on education in America"; and Why Me? acknowledged to be the first documentary on breast cancer in 1974 that resulted in thousands of lives being saved and advocated changes in the treatment of breast cancer in America. DVDs or mp4 copies of the Saltzman documentaries are now available.

In 1974, he created the broadcasting sequence in the USC School of Journalism. During his tenure at USC, Saltzman, who has won three teaching awards, has remained an active journalist producing medical documentaries, functioning as a senior investigative producer for Entertainment Tonight, and writing articles, reviews, columns, and opinion pieces for hundreds of magazines and newspapers. He has been researching the image of the journalist in popular culture for nearly two decades years and is considered a world-wide expert in the field.

The image of the journalist in popular culture is a gold mine of research possibilities. The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture (IJPC), a project of the Norman Lear Center in the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at the University of Southern California, was created in 2000 to investigate and analyze, through research and publication, the conflicting images of the journalist in film, television, radio, fiction (novels, short stories, plays poems), cartoons, comic strips, comic books, commercials and other forms of popular culture to demonstrate their impact on the public’s perception of journalists (www.ijpc.org).

Saltzman pioneered this long-neglected, new field of research rich with untapped material. To help those who want to work in this academic field, the Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture Project has created three major resources: The IJPC Website (www.ijpc.org), the online IJPC Database with more than 86,000 entries, and the peer-review The IJPC Journal, all world-wide sources for the subject. He has been researching the image of the journalist in popular culture for twenty years and is considered one of the leading experts in the field.  Saltzman is co-founding editor of the peer-review The IJPC Journal and creator of the IJPC Web Site and the IJPC Database.

Saltzman, who was awarded the 2005 Journalism Alumni Award from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, the Alumni Association’s highest alumni honor, was named the 2010 national Journalism & Mass Communication Teacher of the Year by the Scripps Howard Foundation. The Scripps Howard Foundation’s National Journalism Awards are considered among the most prestigious awards in American journalism. He received a $10,000 cash prize and The Charles E. Scripps Award at the keynote session during the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication convention in St. Louis in August 2010. He also was recognized at the Scripps Howard Foundation's National Journalism Awards dinner in Cincinnati in May. 2010. For the presentation introduction, click here.

Book Discussion on "Heroes and Scoundrels: The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture" by Matthew C. Ehrlich and Joe Saltzman. Professor Joe Saltzman talked about the way journalists are portrayed in popular culture. This interview, recorded at the University of Southern California, is part of Book TV’s college series. It aired on Sunday May 24 at 10:40 p.m.
 

For a conversation with Saltzman conducted by Norman Corwin, click here.

For Henry Jenkins' three-part interview with Saltzman, click below:
June 28, 2010 (Part One)
June 29, 2010 (Part Two)
July 2, 2010 (Part Three)

Annenberg Research Seminar: The Image of the Gay Journalist in Popular Culture

The Leonard Lopate Show: Projections: Journalism on Film. We take a look at how journalism and reporters have been depicted on film over the decades with Professor Joe Saltzman, director of the Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture Project

Journalists in film and literature - Audio Interview with IJPC Director Joe Saltzman.

IJPC Database Goes Online

Reflections: Richard Baker, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

The Book That Changed My Life - 2015

Five Minutes with Joe Saltzman - August 3, 2015

Publications

Heroes and Scoundrels: The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture by Matthew C. Ehrlich, professor of journalism at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Joe Saltzman, professor of journalism  and communication at the University of Southern California. Publication date: April, 2015. University of Illinois Press. 

In production: Heroes and Scoundrels: The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture video, a 40-hour video supplement to the book for research and classroom use only.   Video Preview: 22:35

Frank Capra and the Image of the Journalist in American Film, by Joe Saltzman, professor of journalism and communication at USC Annenberg. Publication date: 2000. Norman Lear Press.

“Deception and Undercover Journalism,”  Chapter 5 in Journalism Ethics Goes to the Movies, edited by Howard Good. Publication date: 2008. Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD.

Research Report: The Image of the Washington Journalist in Movies and Television: 1932 to 2013
Joe Saltzman, Liz Mitchell pp.1-60. The IJPC Journal, Volume Five
Appendix: Legend and Filmography: The Image of the Washington Journalist in Movies and Television: 1932-2013 PDF
Joe Saltzman, Liz Mitchell pp.61-110. The IJPC Journal, Volume Five

Research Report: The Image of the Public Relations Practitioner in Movies and Television, 1901-2011
Joe Saltzman pp.1-50. The IJPC Journal, Volume 3
Appendix, The Image of the Public Relations Practitioner in Movies and Television, 1901-2011
Joe Saltzman pp.51-85, The IJPC Journal, Volume 3

Analyzing the Images of the Journalist in Popular Culture: A Unique Method of Studying the Public's Perception of Its Journalists and the News Media: “A long-neglected, fertile field for research virtually untapped by journalism and mass communication scholars” by Joe Saltzman, Professor of Journalism, Director of the Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture (IJPC), A Project of the Norman Lear Center, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Southern California. By analyzing the images of the journalist in popular culture over the centuries, the researcher can offer a new perspective on the history of journalism as well as the delicate relationship between the public and its news media. The anger and lack of confidence most of the public has in the news media today is partly based on real-life examples they have seen and heard, but much of the image of the journalist is based on images burned into the public memory from movies, TV and fiction. These images of the journalist have an enormous influence on how the public perceives and judges the news media and they have a profound effect on public opinion and consequently, the public’s support of the effectiveness and freedom of the news media. Many of these images come from age-old sources, long forgotten yet still relevant in the 21st century. Variations of this paper were delivered at the “Media History and History in the Media” conference at the University of Wales, March 31-April 1, 2005 at Gregynog, Wales, and at the Association for Education for Journalism and Mass Communications (AEJMC) in San Antonio, Texas, August 12, 2005.

Video Compilations for research and classroom use only:

The Image of the Washington Journalist in Movies and Television, 1932 to 2013, a two dual layer-disc, 8:20:00 video compilation with 126 movie and television clips tracing the history of the Washington journalist in the 20th and 21st centuries.

The Image of the Public Relations Practitioner in Movies and Television, 1901 to 2011, a three dual layer-disc, 11:46:05 video compilation with 326 movie and television clips tracing the history of the public relations practitioner in the 20th and 21st centuries.

The Image of the Gay Journalist in Movies and Television,1929 to 2009, a three-disc, 4:42:23 video compilation with 123 movie and television clips tracing the history of the gay journalist in the 20th and 21st centuries. Also included is a special supplement on The Image of the Gay Public Relations Practitioner in Movies and Television. 2009.

The Image of the War Correspondent in Movies and Television, 1931-2007, a two-disc, 225-minute compilation with 166 movie and television clips tracing the image of the war correspondent in films and television from 1931 to 2007. 2008.

Journalism Ethics Goes to the Movies, a one-hour-and-50 minute video compilation for IJPC Associates members created to supplement the book edited by Howard Good.(Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD, 2008). Good is a professor of journalism at SUNY New Paltz. He was a pioneering author of a series of books on the image of the journalist in films and novels including Outcasts: The Image of Journalists in Contemporary Films; Girl Reporter: Gender, Journalism, and the Movies; The Drunken Journalist: The Biography of a Film Stereotype, and Acquainted With the Night: The Image of Journalists in American Fiction, 1890 –1930. He’s also written books on media ethics and public education. The IJPC Video follows Journalism Ethics Goes to the Movies chapter by chapter. The book’s 12 chapters explore issues that should concern anyone who aspires to a career in journalism, works in journalism or relies on journalism for daily information. The contributors do their exploring at the movies where sportswriters, war correspondents, investigative reporters, crime reporters, spin-doctors, TV anchors and harried city editors jostle for attention. 2007.

The Image of the Broadcast Journalist in Movies and Television, 1937-2006, an updated two-hours-and-48 minute video compilation for IJPC Associates members containing 200 movie and television clips tracing image of the broadcast journalist in films and television from 1937 to 2006. 2006.

Real-Life Journalists in Movies and Television, 1931-2007, a completely revised and updated two-hour-and-13-minute video compilation for IJPC Associates members containing 79 movie and television clips tracing image of the journalist in films and television from 1939 to 2003 featuring real-life journalists or actors portraying real-life journalists or movies based on the lives of real-life journalists. 2005

Sob Sisters: The Image of the Female Journalist, 1929-2007, a revised and updated two-hour-and-41 minute video compilation with more than 136 movie and television clips documenting the history of the female journalist in film and television in the 20th and 21st centuries. 2004.

Hollywood Looks at the News, 1914-2007, a one hour-and-49-minute video compilation with 165 movie and television clips documenting the history of journalists in film and television in the 20th and 21st century. 2003. Revised 2007.

The Jester & Pharley Phund (http://www.thejester.org) - A non-profit. It's mission is giving children joy, laughter, the love of learning and a way to live up to the motto of the classic children's book, "The Jester Has Lost His Jingle" - "It's up to us to make a difference. It's up to us to care."
"The Jester Has Lost His Jingle" - Los Angeles Times Festival of Books 2015 at USC
Storybook Mom Final Promo and Segment - CBS Sunday Morning 2015
Barbara Saltzman The Jester's Mom - ABC Good Morning America 1995.  Also other news coverage of "The Jester's Mom."

 

Course Titles

Journalism 375/Communication 372/SWMS 371 -- The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture (four units)

Journalism 373 - Journalism Ethics Goes to the Movies (four units)

Journalism 599 - Journalism Ethics Goes to the Movies Graduate Seminar (7 weeks, two units)