Curriculum

The University's general education program requires six courses in different categories, plus writing, foreign language, and diversity requirements.

Visit the USC College of Letters, Arts & Sciences' General Education Program page for more details

As a Communication major, you will also take 24 units of core requirements and 24 units of elective courses in Communication with the option to focus in areas of study. See the USC Catalogue for COMM course descriptions.

New course requirements for Communication majors were implemented in Fall 2016. Students entering in Fall 2016 or after must follow the new requirements. Continuing students (those who entered prior to Fall 2016) may choose to follow the old course requirements or may opt to follow the new course requirements. Students may not combine the requirements.

 

Required Courses for a B.A. in Communication (Entering Fall 2016 or After)

Theoretical and Foundational Classes (12 units):
These courses introduce students to theories and subject matter that provide foundational understanding for upper division coursework in the Communication major. Each area below broadly explores the way messages and meanings are socially and culturally produced, received by individuals and society, and transformed through technological and industrial shifts. Students will take a total of 12 units as follows, choosing one course from each section:

Communication Interaction, Influence, and Impact (4 units)

  • COMM 200 Communication and Social Science (4 units)
  • COMM 313 Communication and Mass Media (4 units; previously known as COMM 203)

Communication, Civic Life, and Culture (4 units)

  • COMM 206 Communication and Culture (4 units)
  • COMM 311 Rhetoric and the Public Sphere (4 units; previously known as COMM 201)

Economics and Technologies of Communication (4 units)

  • COMM 209 Communication and Media Economics (4 units; previously known as COMM 207/208)
  • COMM 309 Communication and Technology (4 units; previously known as COMM 202)

Methods of Communication Practice (8 units):
The courses in this area help to provide students with the critical thinking, tools, and methods of inquiry necessary for the interpretation, development, and expression of messages, systematic arguments, and empirical evidence. Students will take a total of 8 units as follows, choosing one course from each section:

Design and Execution of Arguments (4 units)

  • COMM 204 Public Speaking (4 units)
  • COMM 322 Argumentation and Advocacy (4 units)

Design, Execution, and Interpretation of Empirical Evidence (4 units)

  • COMM 301 Empirical Research in Communication (4 units)
  • COMM 305 Understanding Social Science Research (4 units)

Annenberg Experience (4 units):
Students are required to take one four-unit course that prepares Annenberg students to enhance their digital literacy and contextualize modern communication controversies, contemplating changes in the way we process and produce information. Students must choose one of the following courses:

  • ASCJ 200 Navigating Media and News in the Digital Age (4 units)
  • ASCJ 210 Contours of Change in Media and Communication (4 units)

Elective Courses (24 units):
Students must complete an additional 24 units of Communication course work, consisting of the following: 16 units of upper division COMM courses (COMM 300-499), 4 units of lower or upper division COMM or ASCJ courses, and one 4 unit, 400-level, non-cross listed COMM course (excluding COMM 443, COMM 490, COMM 494, and COMM 499).

 

Required Courses for a B.A. in Communication (Entering Prior to Fall 2016)

Core Courses (16 units)
Students must take 16 units from the following list:

  • COMM 200 Communication and Social Science (4 units)
  • COMM 206 Communication and Culture (4 units)
  • COMM 209 Communication and Media Economics (4 units; previously known as COMM 207/208)
  • COMM 309 Communication and Technology (4 units; previously known as COMM 202)
  • COMM 311 Rhetoric and the Public Sphere (4 units; previously known as COMM 201)
  • COMM 313 Communication and Mass Media (4 units; previously known as COMM 203)

Methods Core Courses (8 units)
Students must also take any two of the following four courses:

  • COMM 204 Public Speaking (4 units) 
  • COMM 301L Empirical Research in Communication (4 units)
  • COMM 305 Understanding Social Science Research (4 units)
  • COMM 322 Argumentation and Advocacy (4 units)

Elective Courses (24 units):
Students must complete an additional 24 units of communication course work, consisting of the following: 16 units of upper division COMM courses (COMM 300-499), 4 units of lower or upper division COMM or ASCJ courses, and one 4 unit, 400-level, non-crosslisted COMM course (excluding COMM 443, COMM 490, COMM 494, and COMM 499).

 

Courses

  • COMM 200 Communication and Social Science
  • COMM 203 Communication and Mass Media
  • COMM 204 Public Speaking
  • COMM 205x Communication Practicum
  • COMM 206 Communication and Culture
  • COMM 209 Communication and Media Economics
  • COMM 300 Entertainment, Communication and Society
  • COMM 301L Empirical Research in Communication
  • COMM 302 Persuasion
  • COMM 303 Learning from Case Studies in Communication
  • COMM 304 Interpersonal Communication
  • COMM 305 Understanding Social Science Research
  • COMM 306 Innovation, Entertainment, and the Arts
  • COMM 307 Sound Clash: Popular Music and American Culture
  • COMM 308 Communication and Conflict
  • COMM 310 Media and Society
  • COMM 311 Rhetoric and the Public Sphere
  • COMM 312 The Business and Culture of Celebrity
  • COMM 313 Communication and Mass Media
  • COMM 315 Health Communication
  • COMM 320 Small Group and Team Communication
  • COMM 321 Communication and Social Media
  • COMM 322 Argumentation and Advocacy
  • COMM 323 Public Deliberation
  • COMM 324m Intercultural Communication
  • COMM 325 Intercultural Britain: Media, History and Identity
  • COMM 330 Rhetoric in Classical Culture
  • COMM 335 Rhetoric in Contemporary Culture
  • COMM 339 Communication Technology and Culture
  • COMM 340 The Cultures of New Media
  • COMM 345 Social and Economic Implications of Communication Technologies
  • COMM 350 Video Games: Content, Industry, and Policy
  • COMM 355 Advertising and Communication
  • COMM 360 The Rhetoric of Los Angeles
  • COMM 363 Media Consumption
  • COMM 364 Comparative Media: United States and the United Kingdom
  • COMM 365 The Rhetoric of London
  • COMM 366 Designing Media and Communication Projects for Social Change
  • COMM 370 The Rhetoric of Ideas: Ideology and Propaganda
  • COMM 371 Censorship and the Law: From the Press to Cyberspace
  • COMM 372 The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture
  • COMM 375 Business and Professional Communication
  • COMM 380 Forensics Laboratory
  • COMM 381 Issues in Contemporary Sport
  • COMM 382 Sports, Business and Media in Today's Society
  • COMM 383m Sports, Communication and Culture
  • COMM 384 Interpreting Popular Culture
  • COMM 385 Survey of Organizational Communication
  • COMM 387 Sports and Social Change
  • COMM 388 Ethics in Human Communication
  • COMM 390 Special Problems
  • COMM 391 Made in Italy: The Marketing of an Ideal
  • COMM 392 Media and Migration in Times of European Crisis
  • COMM 393 Rhetoric of Rome
  • COMM 395m Gender, Media and Communication
  • COMM 396 Fashion, Media and Culture
  • COMM 400 Seminar in Communication
  • COMM 401 Audience Analysis
  • COMM 402 Public Communication Campaigns
  • COMM 411 Communication Criticism
  • COMM 412 Communication and Social Movements
  • COMM 413 Propaganda, Ideology and Public Controversy
  • COMM 414 Communication and Social Change in China
  • COMM 415m African American Rhetoric and Image
  • COMM 421 Legal Communication
  • COMM 422 Legal Issues and New Media
  • COMM 424 Millennium in the Media
  • COMM 425 Communicating Religion
  • COMM 426 Religion, Media and Hollywood: Faith in TV
  • COMM 427 Topics in Media Economics, Law and Policy
  • COMM 430 Global Entertainment
  • COMM 431 Global Strategy for the Communications Industry
  • COMM 432 American Media and Entertainment Industries
  • COMM 433 Home Entertainment
  • COMM 434 Italian Media: Popes, Politicians, and Popular Culture
  • COMM 440 Music as Communication
  • COMM 444 Critical Theories of Sport
  • COMM 449 Perspectives on the Networked Press
  • COMM 450 Visual Culture and Communication
  • COMM 451 Visual Communication and Social Change
  • COMM 454 Media, Money, and Society
  • COMM 455 Advertising and Society
  • COMM 456 Entertainment, Marketing and Culture
  • COMM 457 Youth and Media
  • COMM 458m Race and Ethnicity in Entertainment and the Arts
  • COMM 459 Fact and Fiction: From Journalism to the Docudrama
  • COMM 460 Collaboration and Group Decision Making
  • COMM 465m Gender in Media Industries and Products
  • COMM 466m People of Color and the News Media
  • COMM 467 Gender and the News Media
  • COMM 468 Cross-Cultural Negotiations: Communication and Strategy
  • COMM 470 Information and Communication Technologies Strategic Analysis
  • COMM 473 Advanced Issues in Communication and Technology
  • COMM 475 Environmental Communication
  • COMM 480 Nonverbal Communication
  • COMM 482 Comparative Media in Europe
  • COMM 486 Human and Technological Systems in Organizations
  • COMM 487 Communication and Global Organizations
  • COMM 488 Communication Research in Organizations
  • COMM 489 Campaign Communication
  • COMM 490x Directed Research
  • COMM 493 Comics and Graphic Storytelling (crosslisted as JOUR 493)
  • COMM 494x Research Practicum
  • COMM 495 Honors Seminar
  • COMM 497x Honors Thesis
  • COMM 498 Ethical Issues in Entertainment and Communication
  • COMM 499 Special Topics
  • ASCJ 020x Annenberg Skills
  • ASCJ 100x The Changing World of Communication and Journalism
  • ASCJ 200 Navigating Media and News in the Digital Age
  • ASCJ 220x Annenberg Experimental
  • ASCJ 420 Annenberg Collaboratory
  • ASCJ 440 Engaging Diverse Communities in the Digital Era