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And You Shall Know Us by the Trail of Our Vinyl: The Jewish Past as Told by the Records We Have Loved and Lost
And You Shall Know Us by the Trail of Our Vinyl: The Jewish Past as Told by the Records We Have Loved and Lost
Josh Kun (co-author)
Random House, Inc., 2008

What started out as a mutual affinity for kitschy Jewish album covers–think Neil Diamond baring his chest hair on the cover of Hot August Night or Barbra Streisand in hot pants on the cover of Streisand Superman–soon became a quest for identity, history, and culture between the grooves of LPs. Together, Roger Bennett and Josh Kun embarked on a thrilling journey, scouring the world to collect thousands of vinyl LPs from attics, garage sales, and dusty archives. Pieced together, these scratched, once-loved and now-forgotten audio gems tell a vibrant tale: the story of Jews in America. And You Shall Know Us by the Trail of Our Vinyl spans the history of Jewish recorded music from the 1940s to the 1980s, weaving an account that begins with sacred songs and ends with the holy trinity of Neil, Barbra, and Barry.

Authentic™: The Politics of Ambivalence in a Brand Culture
Authentic™: The Politics of Ambivalence in a Brand Culture
Sarah Banet-Weiser
NYU Press (2012)

Brands are everywhere. Branding is central to political campaigns and political protest movements; the alchemy of social media and self-branding creates overnight celebrities; the self-proclaimed “greening” of institutions and merchant goods is nearly universal. But while the practice of branding is typically understood as a tool of marketing, a method of attaching social meaning to a commodity as a way to make it more personally resonant with consumers, Sarah Banet-Weiser argues that in the contemporary era, brands are about culture as much as they are about economics. That, in fact, we live in a brand culture.

Cable Visions: Television Beyond Broadcasting
Cable Visions: Television Beyond Broadcasting
Edited by Sarah Banet-Weiser, Cynthia Chris and Anthony Freitas
NYU Press, 2007

Banet-Weiser is a co-editor of this volume, which looks beyond broadcasting’s mainstream and toward cable’s alternatives to critically consider the capacity of commercial media to serve the public interest. "Through a series of highly original and carefully researched essays, Cable Visions offers a lively and comprehensive survey of the contemporary multichannel television landscape in the United States," writes William Boddy, author of New Media and Popular Imagination: Launching Radio, Television and Digital Media in the United States.

Case Studies in Strategic Communication (CSSC)
Case Studies in Strategic Communication (CSSC)
Daren Brabham (Editor)


Case Studies in Strategic Communication (CSSC) is dedicated to the study of strategic communication through the case study form. Case studies illustrate the strategies, tactics, and execution of communication campaigns through in-depth coverage of a single situation. CSSC is a peer-reviewed online publication housed at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism.

Case studies have long been central to the study of strategic communication, but these cases have been scattered across textbooks and websites, are quickly outdated, are not fully representative of the many facets of strategic communication, and lack a common format useful for teachers and scholars. Through the ongoing publication of strategic communication case studies online, CSSC aims to develop a living resource of diverse case materials for teachers, scholars, and practitioners.

Commodity Activism: Cultural Resistance in Neoliberal Times
Commodity Activism: Cultural Resistance in Neoliberal Times
Sarah Banet-Weiser (Co-Editor)
NYU Press (2012)

Buying (RED) products—from Gap T-shirts to Apple—to fight AIDS. Drinking a “Caring Cup” of coffee at the Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf to support fair trade. Driving a Toyota Prius to fight global warming. All these commonplace activities point to a central feature of contemporary culture: the most common way we participate in social activism is by buying something.

Roopali Mukherjee and Sarah Banet-Weiser have gathered an exemplary group of scholars to explore this new landscape through a series of case studies of “commodity activism.” Drawing from television, film, consumer activist campaigns, and cultures of celebrity and corporate patronage, the essays take up examples such as the Dove “Real Beauty” campaign, sex positive retail activism, ABC’s Extreme Home Makeover, and Angelina Jolie as multinational celebrity missionary.
Communication Power
Communication Power
Manuel Castells
Oxford University Press (2009)

We live in the midst of a revolution in communication technologies that affects the way in which people feel, think, and behave. Castells argues that mass media — including Web-based media — has become the space where political and business power strategies are played out. Power now lies in the hands of those who understand or control communication. Castells explores the nature of power itself, in the new communications environment. His vision encompasses business, media, neuroscience, technology, and, above all, politics. His case histories include global media deregulation, the misinformation that surrounded the invasion of Iraq, environmental movements, the role of the Internet in the Obama presidential campaign, and media control in Russia and China. In the new network society of instant messaging, social networking, and blogging--"mass self-communication"--politics is fundamentally media politics. This fact is behind a worldwide crisis of political legitimacy that challenges the meaning of democracy in much of the world. Deeply researched, far-reaching in scope, and incisively argued, this is a book for anyone who wants to understand the dynamics and character of the modern world.

Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide
Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide
Henry Jenkins
NYU Press, 2006

Convergence Culture maps a new territory: where old and new media intersect, where grassroots and corporate media collide, where the power of the media producer and the power of the consumer interact in unpredictable ways. Henry Jenkins, one of America's most respected media analysts, delves beneath the new media hype to uncover the important cultural transformations that are taking place as media converge.

Daring Young Men: The Heroism and Triumph of The Berlin Airlift-June 1948-May 1949
Daring Young Men: The Heroism and Triumph of The Berlin Airlift-June 1948-May 1949
Richard Reeves
Simon & Schuster (2010)

In the early hours of June 26, 1948, phones began ringing across America, waking up the airmen of World War II -- pilots, navigators, and mechanics -- who were finally beginning normal lives with new houses, new jobs, new wives, and new babies. Some were given just forty-eight hours to report to local military bases. The president, Harry S. Truman, was recalling them to active duty to try to save the desperate people of the western sectors of Berlin, the enemy capital many of them had bombed to rubble only three years before. Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin had ordered a blockade of the city, isolating the people of West Berlin, using hundreds of thousands of Red Army soldiers to close off all land and water access to the city. He was gambling that he could drive out the small detachments of American, British, and French occupation troops, because their only option was to stay and watch Berliners starve -- or retaliate by starting World War III. The situation was impossible, Truman was told by his national security advisers, including the Joint Chiefs of Staff. His answer: "We stay in Berlin. Period." That was when the phones started ringing and local police began banging on doors to deliver telegrams to the vets. Drawing on service records and hundreds of interviews in the United States, Germany, and Great Britain, Reeves tells the stories of these civilian airmen, the successors to Stephen Ambrose's "Citizen Soldiers," ordinary Americans again called to extraordinary tasks. They did the impossible, living in barns and muddy tents, flying over Soviet-occupied territory day and night, trying to stay awake, making it up as they went along and ignoring Russian fighters and occasional anti-aircraft fire trying to drive them to hostile ground. The Berlin Airlift changed the world. It ended when Stalin backed down and lifted the blockade, but only after the bravery and sense of duty of those young heroes had bought the Allies enough time to create a new West Germany and sign the mutual defense agreement that created NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. And then they went home again. Some of them forgot where they had parked their cars after they got the call.

Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work
Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work
Anne Balsamo
Duke University Press (2011)

Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work (Duke University Press) is a call for taking culture seriously in the design and development of innovative technologies. According to Lawrence Grossberg, author of Cultural Studies in the Future Tense:  “Designing Culture is a tour de force, offering a unique vision of the possibilities for a contemporary cultural studies. Refusing to separate research from pedagogy, technology from culture, or innovation from imagination, Anne Balsamo maps the concrete complexities of specific design processes, and opens up new ways of thinking about—and teaching—technocultures in relation to broader socio-political fields. Her book is required reading for anyone working with contemporary cultures."
The Digital Glocalization of Entertainment
The Digital Glocalization of Entertainment
Paolo Sigismondi
Springer (2011)

In this volume, Paolo Sigismondi explores the dynamics of global media and entertainment, specifically analyzing the implications of the global rise of non-scripted entertainment (as reality TV programs) and the impact and consequences of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) revolution on the content, delivery platforms, and overall business models of the media and entertainment landscape. This work aims at bridging the gap between media theories and industry practices in a rapidly evolving global mediascape, building on scholarship in the field and enriched by case studies and insights from business practice.

Emus Loose in Egnar: Big Stories from Small Towns
Emus Loose in Egnar: Big Stories from Small Towns
Judy Muller
University of Nebraska Press (2011)

At a time when mainstream news media are hemorrhaging and doomsayers are predicting the death of journalism, take heart: the First Amendment is alive and well in small towns across America. In Emus Loose in Egnar, award-winning journalist Judy Muller takes the reader on a grassroots tour of rural American newspapers, from an Indian reservation in Montana to the Alaska tundra to Martha’s Vineyard, and discovers that many weeklies are not just surviving, but thriving.
Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media
Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media
Douglas Thomas (Editor)
Sage Publications, 2006

Believed to be the first critical journal in the field of video gaming, communication professor Douglas Thomas launched Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media to provide an outlet for the growing body of critical articles on gaming, which have been an awkward fit for other academic publications. “What this journal really tries to do is look at the relationship between games, game playing and game culture, and broader sociological questions. It’s the first journal to actually look at cultures of new media in the context of games,” Thomas said. The second issue of the quarterly journal, published in spring 2006, features a paper by noted video game researcher Edward Castronova of Indiana University examining the research value of massively multi-player online games such as the Quest for Camelot, while University of Wales, Newport, professor Barry Atkins examines "The Future - Orientation of Video Game Play."

Governing Global Electronic Networks: International Perspectives on Policy and Power
Governing Global Electronic Networks: International Perspectives on Policy and Power
Dean Ernest J. Wilson III
MIT Press, 2008

The burgeoning use and transformative impact of global electronic networks are widely recognized to be defining features of contemporary world affairs. Less often noted has been the increasing importance of global governance arrangements in managing the many issues raised in such networks. This volume helps fill the gap by assessing some of the key international institutions pertaining to global telecommunications regulation and standardization, radio frequency spectrum, satellite systems, trade in services, electronic commerce, intellectual property, traditional mass media and Internet content, Internet names and numbers, cybercrime, privacy protection, and development. "This valuable compendium provides real insight into the array of debates and issues that the Communications Revolution creates for global politics," said John Zysman, co-director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy at UC Berkeley . "Ernie Wilson's summary and analysis of the diverse materials provides a useful framework."

Information Technologies & International Development
Information Technologies & International Development
Ernest J. Wilson III and Michael L. Best (Founding Editors)
Francois Bar and Kentaro Toyama (Co-Editors in Chief)

Information Technologies & International Development (ITID) is an interdisciplinary open-access journal that focuses on the intersection of information and communication technologies (ICTs) with the "other four billion"— the share of the world population whose countries are not yet widely connected to the Internet nor widely considered in the design of new information technologies. ITID aims to create a networked community of leading thinkers and strategists to discuss the critical issues of ICT and development, an epistemic community that crosses disciplines (especially technologists and social scientists), national boundaries, and the North and South hemispheres.

International Journal of Communication
International Journal of Communication
Larry Gross and Manuel Castells (Editors)


The International Journal of Communication is an online, multi-media, academic journal that adheres to the highest standards of peer review and engages established and emerging scholars from anywhere in the world. The International Journal of Communication is an interdisciplinary journal that, while centered in communication, is open and welcoming to contributions from the many disciplines and approaches that meet at the crossroads that is communication study.

Journal of Communication
Journal of Communication
Michael Cody (Editor in Chief, 2009-2011)


The Journal of Communication is the flagship journal of the International Communication Association and an essential publication for all communication specialists and policy makers. It concentrates on communication research, practice, policy, and theory, bringing to its readers the latest, broadest, and most important findings in the field of communication studies. It is a peer-reviewed journal that encourages international contributions. The Journal of Communication also features an extensive book review section that is published online at the ICA Web site.

Kids Rule!: Nickelodeon and Consumer Citizenship
Kids Rule!: Nickelodeon and Consumer Citizenship
Sarah Banet-Weiser
Duke University Press, 2007

In Kids Rule!, Banet-Weiser examines the Nickelodeon cable network in order to rethink the relationship between children, media, citizenship and consumerism. "Kids Rule! is an immensely important and exciting book," said Angela McRobbie, author of The Uses of Cultural Studies, in a quote from the publisher. "Based on meticulous research, with a strong cultural production approach, it is a book that will be widely read by scholars and students alike. It fills a large gap in this terrain of work and it is lively, thorough and brimming with insight and argument."

Mobile Communication and Society: A Global Perspective
Mobile Communication and Society: A Global Perspective
Manuel Castells, Mireia Fernandez-Ardevol, Jack Linchuan Qiu and Araba Sey
MIT Press, 2006

(From the publisher) Wireless networks are the fastest growing communications technology in history. Are mobile phones expressions of identity, fashionable gadgets, tools for life – or all of the above? Mobile Communication and Society looks at how the possibility of multimodal communication from anywhere to anywhere at any time affects everyday life at home, at work, and at school, and raises broader concerns about politics and culture both global and local.

Outlaw Blues
Outlaw Blues
Jonathan Taplin
Annenberg Press (2011)

Outlaw Blues is a searing tale of the rock and roll and film revolutions of the 1960s and 1970s told by an insider who worked with Bob Dylan and The Band, George Harrison and Martin Scorsese to change the cultural landscape of America. The book is one of the first Enhanced E-Books with more than 100 video clips embedded throughout the story of the American counter-culture. Though much of the book is centered on a group of musicians and filmmakers that author Jonathan Taplin worked with from 1965-1995, it is also the story of the roots of that era—the rebel artists of America’s past—H.D. Thoreau, Mark Twain, Louis Armstrong, Orson Welles, Billie Holiday, Allen Ginsberg—the “mad ones” who made us who we are as a culture.
Parallel Play: Growing Up with Undiagnosed Asperger's
Parallel Play: Growing Up with Undiagnosed Asperger's
Tim Page
Doubleday (2009)

In 1997, Tim Page won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism for his work as the chief classical music critic of The Washington Post, work that the Pulitzer board called “lucid and illuminating.” Three years later, at the age of 45, he was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome–an autistic disorder characterized by often superior intellectual abilities but also by obsessive behavior, ineffective communication, and social awkwardness. In a personal chronicle that is by turns hilarious and heartbreaking, Page revisits his early days through the prism of newfound clarity. Here is the tale of a boy who could blithely recite the names and dates of all the United States’ presidents and their wives in order (backward upon request), yet lacked the coordination to participate in the simplest childhood games. It is the story of a child who memorized vast portions of the World Book Encyclopedia simply by skimming through its volumes, but was unable to pass elementary school math and science. And it is the triumphant account of a disadvantaged boy who grew into a high-functioning, highly successful adult–perhaps not despite his Asperger’s but because of it, as Page believes. For in the end, it was his all-consuming love of music that emerged as something around which to construct a life and a prodigious career.

Projecting Empire: Imperialism and Popular Cinema Projecting Empire
Projecting Empire: Imperialism and Popular Cinema Projecting Empire
Nicholas Cull (co-author)
Macmillan (2009)

Popular cinema is saturated with images and narratives of empire. With Projecting Empire, Cull and co-author James Chapman have written the first major study of imperialism and cinema for over thirty years. This welcome text maps the history of empire cinema in both Hollywood and Britain through a serious of case studies of popular films including biopics, adventures, literary adaptations, melodramas, comedies and documentaries, from the 1930s and 'The Four Feathers' to the present, with Indiana Jones and Three Kings. The authors consider industry-wide trends and place the films in their wider cultural and historical contexts. Using primary sources that include private papers, they look at the presence of particular auteurs in the cinema of Imperialism, including Korda, Lean, Huston and Attenborough, as well as the actors who brought the stories to life, such as Elizabeth Taylor and George Clooney. At a time when imperialism has a new significance in the world, this book will fulfil the needs of students and interested filmgoers alike.

Real-Time Diplomacy: Politics and Power in the Social Media Era
Real-Time Diplomacy: Politics and Power in the Social Media Era
Philip Seib
Macmillan (2012)

The 2011 uprisings in the Middle East proved that democracy retains its appeal, even to people who have long lived without it. They also illustrated how, in a high-speed, media-centric world, conventional diplomacy has become an anachronism. Not only do events move quickly, but so too does public reaction to those events. The cushion of time that enabled policymakers to judiciously gather information and weigh alternatives is gone. Real-Time Diplomacy analyzes the essential, but often unhappy, marriage between diplomacy and new media, evaluating media's reach and influence, and determining how policy makers might take advantage of media's real-time capabilities rather than being driven by them.

Science and the Media
Science and the Media
Geneva Overholser (Co-editor)
American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Science and the Media examines the dynamic between scientists and journalists. The series of essays by scientists, journalists and public relations specialists point to the need for these kinds of professionals to become partners in promoting scientific literacy. The volume examines the sometimes conflicting cultures of journalists, who value speed and clarity, and scientists, whose work requires more nuance and embraces “evolving states of knowledge,” according to the Academy’s description of the work. The study was led by Overholser and by Donald Kennedy, President Emeritus of Stanford University and former editor-in-chief of Science Magazine.

Small Screen, Big Picture: Television and Lived Religion
Small Screen, Big Picture: Television and Lived Religion
Diane Winston
Baylor University Press (2009)

A pioneering study at the intersection of religion and media, Small Screen, Big Picture treats television as a virtual meeting place where Americans across racial, ethnic, economic and religious lines find instructive and inspirational narratives. An interdisciplinary tour de force, this book describes how television converts social concerns, cultural conundrums and metaphysical questions into stories that explore and even shape who we are and would like to be-the building blocks of religious speculation.

Something Incredibly Wonderful Happens: Frank Oppenheimer and the World He Made Up
Something Incredibly Wonderful Happens: Frank Oppenheimer and the World He Made Up
K.C. Cole
Houghton Mifflin (2009)

As a young man Frank Oppenheimer followed in his famous brother’s footsteps—growing up in a privileged Manhattan household, becoming a physicist, working on the atomic bomb. Tragically, Frank and Robert both had their careers destroyed by the Red Scare. But their paths diverged. While Robert died an almost ruined man, Frank came into his own, emerging from ten years of exile on a Colorado ranch to create not just a multimillion dollar institution but also a revolution that was felt all over the world. His Exploratorium was a "museum of human awareness" that combined art and science while it encouraged play, experimentation, and a sense of joy and wonder; its success inspired a transformation in museums around the globe. In many ways it was Frank’s answer to the atom bomb. K. C. Cole—a friend and colleague of Frank’s for many years—has drawn from letters, documents, and extensive interviews to write a very personal story of the man whose irrepressible spirit would inspire so many.

Stardust Monuments: The Saving and Selling of Hollywood
Stardust Monuments: The Saving and Selling of Hollywood
Alison Trope
Dartmouth College Press (2012)

Stardust Monuments spotlights the enduring efforts to memorialize and canonize the history and meaning of Hollywood and American film culture. In this engaging analysis, Alison Trope explores the tensions between art and commerce as they intersect in a range of nonprofit and for-profit institutions and products.

An insightful tour of Hollywood’s past, present, and future, Stardust Monuments examines the establishment of film libraries and museums beginning in the mid 1930s, the many failed attempts to open a Hollywood museum ranging from the 1960s to today, and the more successful recent corporate efforts to use Hollywood’s past in theme restaurants and parks, classic movie channels, and DVD boxed sets.

The Al Jazeera Effect: How the New Global Media Are Reshaping World Politics
The Al Jazeera Effect: How the New Global Media Are Reshaping World Politics
Philip Seib
Potomac Books, Inc., 2008

The battle for hearts and minds in the Middle East is being fought not on the streets of Baghdad, but on the newscasts and talk shows of Al Jazeera. The future of China is being shaped not by Communist Party bureaucrats, but by bloggers working quietly in cyber cafes. The next attacks by al Qaeda will emerge not from Osama bin Laden’s cave, but from cells around the world connected by the Internet. In these and many other instances, traditional ways of reshaping global politics have been superseded by the influence of new media—satellite television, the Internet, and other high-tech tools. What is involved is more than a refinement of established practices. We are seeing a comprehensive reconnecting of the global village and a reshaping of how the world works. "Seib constructs an imaginative, thorough and balanced assessment of how news—ever more a dialogue and less an event—is redistributing political power," according to a Publishers Weekly review.

The Evolution of Media
The Evolution of Media
A. Michael Noll
Rowman & Littlefield, 2006

Communication professor emeritus A. Michael Noll’s 11th book tracks the development of mass media—radio, television and print—and interpersonal media, such as telecommunications and new media, concurrently. In the process, Noll develops a system to identify technological requirements and applications of media systems in both categories. With a final section detailing a methodology for predicting the future success of new media technologies, Noll’s book provides a thorough analysis of the ways in which humans communicate.

The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture Journal
The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture Journal
Joe Saltzman (Co-founding editor)


The IJPC Journal  is an online academic journal that adheres to the highest standards of peer review. Its purpose is to further the mission of The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture Project to investigate and analyze, through research and publication, the conflicting images of journalists in every aspect of popular culture, from film, television, radio, fiction, commercials, cartoons, comic books to music, art, humor and video games -- demonstrating their impact on the public's perception of journalists.

"We believe this has been a long-neglected field for research, one that has been untapped by journalism and mass communication scholars," co-founding Journal editor and USC Annenberg journalism professor Joe Saltzman said. "By analyzing the images of the journalist in popular culture over the centuries, the researcher can offer a new perspective on the history of journalism as well as the delicate relationship between the public and its news media. The public's lack of confidence in the news media today is partly based on real-life examples they have seen and heard and partly on characters burned into the public memory from movies, television and fiction."

The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia
The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia
Andrew Lih
Hyperion, 2009

With more than 2.7 million individual articles on everything from Aa! (a Japanese pop group) to Zzyzx, California, written by an army of volunteer contributors, Wikipedia is the No. 8 site on the World Wide Web. Andrew Lih, an academic and Wikipedian tells the story of how it all happened — from the first glimmer of an idea to the global phenomenon. The book traces what enabled the creation of Wikipedia, starting with the Internet culture that inspired the hacker ethos, USENET, and the Free Software movement.

Toward a New Public Diplomacy: Redirecting U.S. Foreign Policy
Toward a New Public Diplomacy: Redirecting U.S. Foreign Policy
Philip Seib (editor)
MacMillan (2009)

Proponents of American public diplomacy sometimes find it difficult to be taken seriously. Everyone says nice things about relying less on military force and more on soft power, but it has been hard to break away from the longtime conventional wisdom that America owes its place in the world primarily to its muscle. Today, however, policy makers are recognizing that merely being a “superpower”--whatever that means now--does not ensure security or prosperity in a globalized society.Toward a New Public Diplomacy explains public diplomacy and makes the case for why it will be the crucial element in the much-needed reinvention of American foreign policy.

Transforming Global Information and Communication Markets: The Political Economy of Innovation
Transforming Global Information and Communication Markets: The Political Economy of Innovation
Jonathan Aronson (co-author)
MIT Press, 2009

Jonathan Aronson and UC San Diego professor Peter Cowhey suggest in Transforming Global Information and Communication Markets that the interests of all ICT suppliers and consumers are changing rapidly. This is because of the diffusion of Internet, wireless, and broadband technology; growing modularity in the design of technologies; distributed computing infrastructures; and rapidly changing business models for IT industry leaders. Aronson and Cowhey posit that the direction of the evolution of ICT markets depends on politics and policy. They argue that continued rapid innovation and economic growth requires new approaches in global governance that will reconcile diverse interests and enable competition to flourish.

Understanding Ethnic Media: Producers, Consumers, and Societies
Understanding Ethnic Media: Producers, Consumers, and Societies
Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach (co-author)
SAGE (2010)

At present, the picture of the ethnic media is an incomplete one: While there is significant material on the portrayal of ethnic minorities in the mainstream media (and on how these representations affect ethnic perceptions), there is very little material/research on how the media produced by ethnic communities, for ethnic communities affect (1) the perceptions of self and of the ethnic community and (2) how the production and consumption of ethnic media affects the character of the larger media landscape. Understanding Ethnic Media approaches the ethnic media from the consumers’ point of view AND the producers’ vantage point, as changes that occur in the ethnic community affect the media, and vice versa. This accessible textbook strives to bridge the gap between the consumer and the production-centered research as it examines the relationships (a) between the ethnic media available in particular markets and (b) between the ethnic and mainstream media.

Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence
Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence
By A.J. Langguth
Simon & Schuster, 2006

Journalism professor emeritus A.J. Langguth’s 10th book picks up where his earlier book Patriots: The Men Who Started the American Revolution left off: at the first rumblings of the War of 1812. Richly rendered battle scenes are interspersed with historical portraits of James and Dolley Madison, Davy Crockett, the Shawnee chieftain Tecumseh and Andrew Jackson, among others. "Besides being a good read, Union 1812 allows you to discover the second wave of our founders with a renewed sense of awe and surprise," historian Douglas Brinkley wrote in the Washington Post.